Need CEUs? Attend our free ANSI Webinar

Webinar Invitation:
YOUR SIMPLIFIED GUIDE TO ANSI Z358.1

Become a subject matter expert of your emergency eyewash and shower equipment including weekly and annual testing.

CEUs will be provided to ASPE, ABIH, and IFMA members. A Certificate of Attendance can be provided to those who belong to other organizations.

DATE:                        Thursday, October 11th, 2018
TIME:                         10am-11am PT / 1pm-2pm ET
PRESENTERS:            Justin Dunn, Product Specialist/Trainer
                                    Samantha Hoch, Marketing Strategist

The webinar will cover: 

Attendees will receive these complimentary materials after the webinar: 

If you cannot attend the live session, make sure to register to receive the recording.

Testing Your Emergency Showers and Eyewashes Isn’t Just an Annual Thing

[via OH&S]

With OSHA fine increases of 80 percent taking effect in August 2016, violations for inappropriate or inadequate eyewash and shower equipment have resulted in penalties above $100,000.

By Samantha Hoch
Oct 01, 2017

The standard guiding the placement, functionality, and maintenance requirements for emergency showers and eyewashes is ANSI/ISEA Z358.1, which was last revised in 2014. In its current form, it is the clearest and most useful tool for protecting workers from eye, face, and body injuries resulting from caustic and corrosive materials introduced by workplace incidents such as spills, splashes, and blown particulates.

The standard requires stringent testing to be conducted on a regular basis to ensure properly functioning equipment is being provided at all times if an incident were to occur. We should all understand that compliance is not a once-a-year or once-a-month responsibility. Compliance is an all-day, every-day requirement. Accordingly, emergency showers and eyewashes are required by the ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2014 Standard to be activated weekly, with a more thorough evaluation on an annual basis. This requirement is established in Sections including 4.6.2, 4.6.5.

In practice, emergency response equipment such as eyewashes and showers sometimes falls to the wayside when it comes to maintenance, especially when prioritized against emergency preparedness equipment such as eye protection and fall protection. It’s pertinent to know that OSHA does not prioritize or take a backseat when it comes to providing adequate and properly functioning equipment, regardless whether the equipment aids in pre- or post-incident situations. With OSHA fine increases of 80 percent taking effect in August 2016, violations for inappropriate or inadequate eyewash and shower equipment have resulted in penalties of more than $100,000.

ANSI WEEKLY MINIMUM PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS

The standard itself has three minimum requirements for weekly inspections:

  1. Emergency equipment shall be activated weekly. (Each piece of equipment is required to be activated.)
  2. Activation shall ensure flow of water to the head(s) of the device. (This would be both the eyewash or eye/face wash head as well as the showerhead.)
  3. Duration of the activation shall be sufficient to ensure all stagnant water is flushed from the unit itself and all sections of piping that do not form part of a constant circulation system, also known as “dead leg” portions. (The duration is determined by the length of piping where stagnant water could be sitting before it reaches the head(s) of the unit.)

In addition to the above weekly minimum performance checklist required by ANSI/ISEA, it is recommended as a best practice to conduct additional weekly functional checks. The purpose of these additional checks is to fully ensure the equipment is operating correctly and is capable of providing proper first aid in the event of an emergency.

ACCESS

SHOWER

EYEWASH / EYE/FACE WASH

COMBINATION UNIT

TEMPERATURE

PLUMBED SHOWER AND EYEWASH EQUIPMENT

As a general statement, all equipment needs to be inspected weekly to ensure that there is a flushing fluid supply and that the equipment is in good repair. If the equipment is of a plumbed design, then it should also be activated weekly to clear the supply line of any sediment buildup and to minimize any microbial contamination due to stagnant water.

SELF-CONTAINED EYEWASH AND SHOWER EQUIPMENT7603_wHose crop

Self-contained, also often referred to as “portable,” emergency response equipment is typically used in locations where there is either no access to water or at highly mobile sites where hazards are mobile. The ANSI/ISEA requirement for this type of equipment is to be visually inspected weekly to determine if the flushing fluid needs to be exchanged or supplemented (Sections 4.6.3 and others). The units should be maintained as per the manufacturer’s specific model instructions. A majority of self-contained units that use potable water also offer a sterile bacteriostatic additive option to prevent the water from growing bacteria. An exchange of the water and refill of the additive is required every three months for most additive products, as well as rinsing the unit clean between the exchanges. If an additive is not being used, then the water should be exchanged on a weekly basis, at a minimum, with a thorough tank cleaning monthly. On an annual basis, self-contained units are required to undergo the full test just as plumbed units do.

The question is often asked whether a company must hire a certified tester to conduct the weekly and annual inspections. Fortunately, there are no prerequisite or certification requirements to be able to test the equipment, although having a complete understanding of the installation and performance requirements will aid in ensuring conformance. There are various training tools, including Online Competent Person Training, offered by equipment manufacturers and others for individuals to become subject matter experts. This allows company personnel to get familiar with what to look for and how to conduct the tests appropriately. Many companies today opt to have an outside third-party inspection performed for them annually, which provides an added measure of credibility and assurance to the review process.

Facilities that contain hundreds of shower and eyewash units should strive to create as many subject matter experts as possible. Once trained, the weekly checks can be completed rather quickly. Creating facility maps, having full testing kits available, and holding reoccurring training classes can assist in the tedious, yet crucial weekly task.

Worker protection should be a priority in every safety plan and simply providing emergency showers and eyewashes is not enough. It is necessary to inspect, test, and monitor equipment readiness and performance for optimal response.

 

ANSI Z358.1 DEBATE: “1-Touch” vs. “1-Second” Activation

The  ANSI Z358.1 Standard (American National Standard) mandates that proper eyewash activation – which describes a unit going from “off” to “on”- shall take one second or less.  This requirement has held true since the inception of the ANSI Standard in 1981 and throughout all revisions including 1990, 1998, 2004, 2009 and 2014. Despite this, the myth that the eyewash must go from “off” to “on” in one motion continues to be inaccurately shared.

To quote the 2014 Standard: “The valve shall be simple to operate and shall go from “off” to “on” in 1 second or less.”

This disconnect in awareness of the activation requirement has come up especially pertaining to faucet-mounted eyewashes where it is required for the user to turn on the water supply and then activate the unit, hence a two motion activation.

Specifically, the Haws® AXION® eyePOD® faucet-mounted eyewash has proven through testing that it meets the “off to on in one second or less” activation requirement.

Mounting easily to standard faucets, the AXION eyePOD provides healthcare offices, laboratories, schools, and even households with medically consistent inverted eyewash flushing technology.

As seen below, a simple rotation of the unit transforms normal faucet capabilities into a fully-functioning, ANSI compliant eyewash station.

eyepod stage 1 eyepod stage 2 eyepod stage 3 eyepod stage 4

Medically Superior Response®
The trademarked inverted water streams gently flush contaminants away from sensitive glands and ducts that surround the eye. The added protection to these valuable organs helps reduce against unnecessary injury.

Click here to learn more about the AXION eyePOD.

If interested in pricing information or receiving a quote, click here.

For more information on the ANSI Z358.1 Standard for emergency showers and eyewashes, visit our ANSI Resources page.

ANSI Site Survey Helps Leading Chemical Producer Meet Safety Standards

surveycs

BACKGROUND
Assuring chemical products are disposed of safely, with human health and environment in mind, should be high priority for any chemical manufacturer. As one of the leading producers of olefin and polyolefin, a U.S. plant makes conducting business in a safe, injury free, and environmentally responsible manner more than just a way of doing business, but also an ethical principal actively demonstrated on a daily basis. Although this level of safety is thoroughly practiced throughout the company, hazards are still a reality, therefore a facility must be equipped with suitable emergency response equipment at all times.

OBJECTIVE
Within their Research Center resided over 30 outdated, non-compliant emergency showers and eyewashes. The units did not meet the ANSI Z358.1 standard due to their installation time and age, which was prior to the issuance of the original Z358.1 standard in 1981. And, as there is no grandfather clause within the standard, the onsite EHS Supervisor knew the units needed to be upgraded and brought up to current compliance, otherwise OSHA fines could ensue.

SOLUTION
When the Supervisor was offered a complimentary onsite ANSI-compliance survey of their emergency showers and eyewashes courtesy of a local Haws® representative, the Supervisor was introduced to the AXION® technology and took an immediate liking to its unique, comfortable water streams. In addition, the safety professional was drawn to the Haws products because they are the only product on the market with flushing capabilities consistent with EMT and emergency room procedures. After the survey debriefing, the Supervisor and Haws Representative created a detailed action item list for the multiple non-compliant units to be upgraded. Once the needed equipment and parts were received, all of the units were effortlessly converted to AXION for ANSI Z358.1 compliance.

RESULTS
With very little free time, the EHS Supervisor found the Haws ESEW Survey Program and process helpful and made things much easier to manage. The Research Center has also signed up to take advantage of Haws’ Annual Inspection offering, as a comprehensive annual test is required by ANSI. “Reviewing the process afterwards, we were not sold anything we didn’t need. It was a great experience working with such an honest company as Haws,” said the Supervisor.

ABOUT THE PROGRAM
As the industry leader, Haws can help bring awareness to the hidden dangers of inadequate emergency response by providing your facility the opportunity to receive a complimentary ANSI compliance emergency shower and eye/face wash survey. The onsite review includes a detailed inspection report, executive summary chart, summary of recommendations, and an interactive debriefing to review material.

By taking advantage of Haws’ ANSI Emergency Shower and Eye/Face Wash Survey Program, you will be able to ensure your facility not only meets the most recent ANSI Z358.1 Standards, but also provide proper functionality and appropriate first aid capabilities in the event of an emergency.

To learn more or sign up for the program, please visit www.hawsco.com/survey.

Featured Editorial: When Overfamiliarity Becomes a Problem

Avoid the dangerous trap in emergency equipment maintenance.

By Casey Hayes

Weekly status checks should be performed only by people who are paying attention to absolutely everything and using a checklist that ensures all required elements are being properly reviewed. (Haws photo)

Whether it’s the back of your own hand or the drive you take to work five days a week, we become exceptionally familiar with certain things. And even though both of these examples are something you see regularly, you’re likely missing the changes that are happening right before your eyes. It makes sense—things such as aging and maturing landscapes take place over a long period of time. You simply become accustomed to what you see day in and day out.

The same familiarity can be true of emergency equipment maintenance. And that’s a problem. Changes and deterioration to your emergency equipment can often be hidden from view or take place over a protracted period. In either case, noting a problem likely takes a greater degree of attention. Better yet, it requires an objective, third-party evaluation.

Continue reading the full editorial on the OH&S Website>>

This article originally appeared in the October 2015 issue of Occupational Health & Safety.

FREE WEBINAR: New ANSI Z358.1-2014 Revisions

Your Simplified Guide to ANSI Z358.1-2014

DATE: Thursday, February 26th, 2015

TIME: 10:00-11:00a PT/ 1:00-2:00p ET

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) introduced an update to the ANSI Z358.1 Standard for Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment in January 2015.

REGISTER NOW for the “Your Simplified Guide to ANSI Z358.1-2014” webinar to gain insightful knowledge and receive answers on ANSI requirements from a safety-industry expert, Casey Hayes, Director of Haws Integrated Operations. Hayes has more than 25 years of safety experience and contributed to the development of the current ANSI Z358.1 standard.

_JIM2235

In this FREE webinar, we’ll provide insight into ANSI requirements for:
* Emergency Eye/Face Washes
* Emergency Combination Units
* Emergency Drench Showers
* Tepid Water
* 2014 Z358.1 Revisions

REGISTER NOW for the “Your Simplified Guide to ANSI Z358.1-2014” webinar to gain insightful knowledge and receive answers on ANSI requirements from a safety-industry expert, Casey Hayes, Director of Haws Integrated Operations. Hayes has more than 25 years of safety experience and contributed to the development of the current ANSI Z358.1 standard.

This is a great opportunity to see how Haws Integrated can help you maintain ANSI compliance with a live Q&A portion.

REGISTER HERE