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5 Kooky Moments In The History of Drinking Fountains


Here at Haws, a special moment in history transpired when Luther Haws invented the drinking fountain in 1906. Along with this special moment in history, there are interesting happenings that go along with the early invention of drinking fountains. Here are 5 kooky moments in history regarding drinking fountains that you may not have known.

UNITED STATES - MAY 13:  "Temperance" Statue on a the corner of 7th and Indiana NW.  (Photo By Tom Williams/Roll Call/Getty Images)

  • Among the biggest supporters of drinking fountains were temperance groups, who thought they would discourage people from drinking so much alcohol. Temperance groups were among the wealthy in the earthy 19th century. Temperance groups supported the drinking fountain movement by funding the building  of more drinking fountains.
  • Around 1920, settled power  on water fountains= with slanted jets of water as the safest, most sensible format and they’ve remained pretty similar ever since.
Students in hallway by drinking fountain

Students in hallway by drinking fountain

FRANCE - JUNE 01:  Cyclist Refreshing Themselves At A Fountain In Paris On June 1930  (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

FRANCE – JUNE 01: Cyclist Refreshing Themselves At A Fountain In Paris On June 1930 (Photo by Keystone-France/Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • At the beginning of the 20th Century, people finally realized that common cups were completely disgusting and insane. In early drinking fountains metal cups were used and health promoters decided this was a terrible idea.

 

  • In the late 1980’s, drinking fountains became controversial once again– because of lead poisoning.

RED MESA, AZ - OCTOBER 17: Covered and unusable water fountains are seen in the hallway at Red Mesa High School on October 17, 2014 in Red Mesa, AZ. The school's drinking water is undrinkable due to the high levels of arsenic. The Red Mesa Redskins is a small Navajo school in northeast Arizona. The Redskins became the school's mascot in 1974 when a student named Raymond Oldman thought of the name after several students were asked to come up with a school mascot. The school is on the Navajo reservation and when the Navajos are asked about their mascot, most are proud to be Redskins. The team logo is a replica of NFL's Washington Redskins. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

  • Then drinking fountains met their strongest adversary yet: bottled water.
Kirkland brand bottled water is displayed for sale at a Costco Wholesale Corp. store in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Thursday, May 29, 2014. Costco Wholesale Corp., the largest U.S. warehouse-club chain, posted fiscal third-quarter profit that missed analysts' estimates even as comparable sales gained 6 percent. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Kirkland brand bottled water is displayed for sale at a Costco Wholesale Corp. store in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., on Thursday, May 29, 2014. Costco Wholesale Corp., the largest U.S. warehouse-club chain, posted fiscal third-quarter profit that missed analysts’ estimates even as comparable sales gained 6 percent. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images